US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District

Recent Articles

Military working dogs to get new woof over their heads thanks to Omaha District
8/15/2019 UPDATED
If you were asked where the US Army Corps of Engineers Omaha District was building a new kennel for military working dogs, what would your guess be?Newfoundland? Barksdale Air Force Base?The answer is...
Managing Army Corps Water Resource Projects
6/26/2019 UPDATED
Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages thousands of water resource projects across the country. The Corps generates hydropower, supplies water to cities and industry, regulates development...
Getting to Know the Omaha District: Chuck McWilliams
6/20/2019
With more 700,000 square miles within its area of responsibility, the Omaha District’s 1,200+ employees bring very unique skillsets and experiences to the District’s broad mission set. Positions...
Corps of Engineers leveraging drone technology to capture imagery after flooding in Midwest
5/10/2019 UPDATED
In mid-to-late March, flood water covered much of eastern Nebraska, western Iowa, and northern Missouri. Due to the extreme amount of water in the area, members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,...
Omaha District System Restoration Team in full swing bringing levee system back up
5/1/2019
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District responded to the devastating unregulated runoff event of 2019 by activating the Omaha Systems Restoration Team, whose mission is to provide regional,...
Results:
Archive: 2014
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  • June

    Engineering, more than a full-time job

    Engineers are needed around-the-world for their knowledge and expertise. Their skills and talents are honed through formal education and job experiences and many choose to share their talents through volunteering. Jennifer Davis, a hydrological engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District is a volunteer with the Nebraska Chapter of Engineers without Borders (EWB-NE). In June 2013, a team from the EWB-NE spent two weeks in Uganda working on rain harvesting projects. Traveling to Uganda were eight representatives of the Nebraska chapter: two students, a student chapter advisor from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and five members of the Nebraska professional chapter, including Davis.
  • April

    Delicate dance with a dinosaur

    There are dozens of elements within the collection including pieces that are at least 5 feet long and take up the length of an entire crate and pieces that are smaller than 5 centimeters, wrapped in foil and paper and stored in sealed plastic bags. Following a checklist that identifies the crate, the box, the body part, and the bone piece; the team photographs and inspects the condition of each fossilized bone.
  • March

    Greybull Levee performs as designed reducing risks from ice jam flooding

    While snowmelt and ice jam flooding can occur at any time, they typically occur during early spring thaw. Any ice jam can cause flooding or rapid increases in water levels within a short time period. Residents living near these rivers are reminded to monitor reports closely for ice jam flooding and be prepared to relocate to higher ground if flooding occurs. The levee in Greybull, Wyo., reduced risks to the town during recent ice jam flooding.
  • Project maintenance, cavitation repairs and OJT

    Among the various projects taking place at Gavins Point Power Plant, generator unit number three was recently dewatered to allow project crews to inspect the draft tube for damage caused by cavitation and make the necessary repairs. Cavitation repairs in the draft tube for unit three will continue through mid-March. Additional maintenance and rehabilitation projects are also underway at the Gavins Point project including replacing three power transformers and rehabilitating the spillway’s tainter gates. Work will move to unit two for annual generator maintenance, to install new un-watering and drain valves, to install a new motor control center, and replace switchgear equipment.