US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District

Recent Articles

Omaha District partners with NRD in ground breaking levee restoration efforts
10/16/2019
The Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District broke ground on levee improvements for the R-613 and R-616 levee systems at Haworth Park, in Belleville, Oct. 15. ...
Military working dogs to get new woof over their heads thanks to Omaha District
8/15/2019 UPDATED
If you were asked where the US Army Corps of Engineers Omaha District was building a new kennel for military working dogs, what would your guess be?Newfoundland? Barksdale Air Force Base?The answer is...
Managing Army Corps Water Resource Projects
6/26/2019 UPDATED
Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages thousands of water resource projects across the country. The Corps generates hydropower, supplies water to cities and industry, regulates development...
Getting to Know the Omaha District: Chuck McWilliams
6/20/2019
With more 700,000 square miles within its area of responsibility, the Omaha District’s 1,200+ employees bring very unique skillsets and experiences to the District’s broad mission set. Positions...
Corps of Engineers leveraging drone technology to capture imagery after flooding in Midwest
5/10/2019 UPDATED
In mid-to-late March, flood water covered much of eastern Nebraska, western Iowa, and northern Missouri. Due to the extreme amount of water in the area, members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,...
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Archive: September, 2014
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  • September

    Recycling playground equipment brings smiles and benefits to Autism Center

    Life left in playground equipment allows for it to be donated rather than recycled and put to great use for a local Autism Center in Colorado. Thanks to the efforts of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers and partnership with a Corps contractor, children at the Alpine Autism Center are enjoying the new playground equipment, which brings them much joy.
  • Telling the Cache la Poudre Story at the Civil Works Review Board

    Getting to the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers' Civil Works Review Board is no quick, easy task-just ask Steve Rothe, USACE Project Manager for a proposed environmental restoration project along the Cache la Poudre River in Greeley, Colo.
  • Safety drills prepare crews for “what if”

    Crews performing a repair contract at Big Bend Dam recently held an exercise to practice safely rescuing a worker who has become incapacitated in their work area. Contractor J.F. Brennan is repairing the spillway gates at Big Bend Dam near Chamberlain, S.D. During the exercise, a mannequin, playing the part of an incapacitated worker who was overcome by paint fumes, needed to be rescued from an area 25 feet above the spillway concrete and 50 feet from the nearest mechanical lift. Once the team extracted the mannequin from the work area, they faced the additional challenge of moving it out of the spillway over the 20-foot-high wing wall using the lift and providing first aid while getting medical attention in a remote location.
  • Corps employees take skills on the road to aid a developing country

    Engineers from the Omaha and Philadelphia USACE Districts recently teamed up with a biologist from the Europe District and an environmental chief from Fort Benning, Ga., after being retained by the Millennium Challenge Corporation to provide technical assessments for prioritizing road projects in Africa. In support to the Government of Tanzania they executed inspection of more than 450 miles of roadway, determined overall road upgrade costs and planned road investment budgets for the next fiscal year.
  • Corps Section 14 project facilitates Scribner’s promising future

    In the spring of 2010, a major flood from the Elkhorn River caused the left river bank just upstream from County Road F and the Elkhorn River Bridge near Scribner, Neb. to erode back 200 feet and decimated an entire tree line several hundred feet long. The Corps' Section 14 Emergency Streambank and Shoreline Protection project will consist of a series of five spur dikes at various locations along the eroded bank. A construction contract was awarded in August 2014 to Iowa-based Niewohner Construction, Inc. for approximately $289,000. Once notice to proceed is given, the project is expected to take no more than six months to complete.