US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District

Recent Articles

Omaha District partners with NRD in ground breaking levee restoration efforts
10/16/2019
The Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District broke ground on levee improvements for the R-613 and R-616 levee systems at Haworth Park, in Belleville, Oct. 15. ...
Military working dogs to get new woof over their heads thanks to Omaha District
8/15/2019 UPDATED
If you were asked where the US Army Corps of Engineers Omaha District was building a new kennel for military working dogs, what would your guess be?Newfoundland? Barksdale Air Force Base?The answer is...
Managing Army Corps Water Resource Projects
6/26/2019 UPDATED
Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages thousands of water resource projects across the country. The Corps generates hydropower, supplies water to cities and industry, regulates development...
Getting to Know the Omaha District: Chuck McWilliams
6/20/2019
With more 700,000 square miles within its area of responsibility, the Omaha District’s 1,200+ employees bring very unique skillsets and experiences to the District’s broad mission set. Positions...
Corps of Engineers leveraging drone technology to capture imagery after flooding in Midwest
5/10/2019 UPDATED
In mid-to-late March, flood water covered much of eastern Nebraska, western Iowa, and northern Missouri. Due to the extreme amount of water in the area, members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,...
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Archive: June, 2014
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  • June

    Collaboration leads to flood risk solutions in Schuyler

    The first half of the month of June brought heavy rainfall to northeastern Nebraska including the community of Schuyler. Heavy storms the weekend of June 20 caused lowland flooding along Shell Creek reminding residents of Schuyler of the importance of constructing a new levee. The Shell Creek Levee project experienced work delays during the week of June 23 because of the increased precipitation and runoff. Ceremonial shovels broke ground in Schuyler March 27 and despite rain and chilly temperatures, warmth from smiles radiated from the project team.
  • Engineering, more than a full-time job

    Engineers are needed around-the-world for their knowledge and expertise. Their skills and talents are honed through formal education and job experiences and many choose to share their talents through volunteering. Jennifer Davis, a hydrological engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District is a volunteer with the Nebraska Chapter of Engineers without Borders (EWB-NE). In June 2013, a team from the EWB-NE spent two weeks in Uganda working on rain harvesting projects. Traveling to Uganda were eight representatives of the Nebraska chapter: two students, a student chapter advisor from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and five members of the Nebraska professional chapter, including Davis.