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Missouri River Water Management News

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  • Draft EA available for comment on Ramberg to Mandan, Berthold pipeline system maintenance project on Little Missouri River near Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota

    OMAHA, Neb. – A draft environmental assessment (EA) for a proposal to perform maintenance activities to prevent scour on two existing Tesoro High Plains Pipeline Company, LLC crude oil pipelines located along the Little Missouri River, on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-administered land near Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota, is currently available for public review.
  • Annual sediment flushing exercise scheduled at Cherry Creek Reservoir

    OMAHA, Neb. — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, will conduct its annual sediment flushing exercise at Cherry Creek Reservoir, Colorado, Wednesday, May 26.
  • Annual sediment flushing exercise scheduled at Cherry Creek Reservoir

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, will conduct its annual sediment flushing exercise at Cherry Creek Reservoir, Colorado, Wednesday, May 26.
  • USACE, Hamburg breaking ground to raise Ditch 6 levee

    Omaha, Neb.—The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, in conjunction with the city of Hamburg, Iowa, will conduct a groundbreaking ceremony May 5 at 11 a.m. to kickoff construction to rehabilitate the Hamburg Ditch 6 levee. The ceremony will take place at Highway 333 (North Street) on the east side of the levee.
  • USACE seeks public comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for capital improvements in Napoleon, North Dakota

    Omaha, Neb. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District announces a draft environmental assessment for capital improvements in the city of Napoleon, N.D. is available for public review through May 28, 2021.
  • Virtual public meetings scheduled for Fort Peck Dam test flows draft environmental impact statement

    OMAHA, Neb. - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District will host virtual public meetings on Tuesday, May 4, and Thursday, May 6, from 6-8:30 p.m. CST, to gather input on the recently released draft Fort Peck Dam test flow environmental impact statement. The draft EIS assesses test flow capacity from Fort Peck Dam to promote growth and survival of pallid sturgeon during the free swimming, juvenile stage prior to their settling out into the headwaters of Lake Sakakawea.
  • Oahe Dam planning prescribed grassland, dam embankment burns

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District announces, in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service, South Dakota Game Fish and Parks and local volunteer fire departments, plans to conduct several prescribed fires on USACE property around Oahe Dam in the coming weeks.
  • USACE announces release plans at Jamestown and Pipestem reservoirs

    OMAHA, Neb – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District announced that maximum combined releases are not expected to exceed 200 cubic feet per second this year. Significant rainfall could necessitate higher release levels.
  • USACE conducting dam safety modification study efforts at Garrison Dam in North Dakota

    OMAHA, Neb. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District is conducting a dam safety modification study at Garrison Dam, near Riverdale, North Dakota. The study addresses risks associated with the design of the concrete spillway. These risks were identified during the 2011 Missouri River flood, when the Garrison Dam’s spillway was used for the first time in the dam’s nearly 70 year history to help control the flow of the Missouri River and lessen the impacts of severe flooding on downstream communities like Bismarck.
  • Construction project begins below Gavins Point Dam

    YANKTON, S.D. – A large construction contract has begun in the area below Gavins Point Dam along Lake Yankton. The project is to connect relief wells, which are at the bottom, or “toe” of the dam, that are designed to relieve excess water pressure on the earthen structure. There are 75 relief wells and numerous discharges into Lake Yankton. Of those 75 relief wells, 31 will be connected into three main discharges. This will allow for a more controlled discharge. Once the main discharges are installed, the ground will be backfilled with dirt to cover the discharge pipes and prevent any erosion.