Missouri River Water Management News

Missouri River Water Management News Releases are available on the Northwestern Division website.RSS Feed

Results:
Category: Water Management
Clear
  • Heavy Rain in CO means more releases changes for Tri-Lakes Dams

    Heavy rain, which fell Thursday night, increased stages along Bear Creek, Cherry Creek, and the South Platte River downstream from the Tri-Lakes Dams.Releases at Chatfield Dam will be held at 1000 cfs through the weekend and will be gradually increased next week as downstream flows recede. Releases from Bear Creek Dam also remain at 200 cfs to allow flows on Bear Creek downstream of the dam to recede and will likely be increased on Saturday to 500 cfs. Releases from Cherry Creek Dam will be held at 50 cfs today due to high flows on Cherry Creek between the dam and the South Platte River. Releases will likely be increased to 100 cfs tomorrow to allow for future flexibility for flood risk management at the dam.
  • Releases from Tri-Lakes Dams reduced to accommodate rainfall

    In anticipation of forecast rainfall today, releases from Chatfield and Bear Creek Dams will be reduced to mitigate flood risk in the Denver area. In anticipation of forecast rainfall today, releases from Chatfield and Bear Creek Dams will be reduced to mitigate flood risk in the Denver area. At Bear Creek Dam, releases will be reduced from 500 cfs to 200 cfs this afternoon. At Cherry Creek Dam, releases remain unchanged at 50 cfs.
  • Releases at Tri-Lake Dams changing to reduce reservoir pool elevations

    Cooler temperatures the past week have slowed the mountain snowmelt runoff into Bear Creek and Chatfield Reservoirs in the Denver area. However, pool elevations at Bear Creek and Chatfield Reservoirs are expected to rise as temperatures rebound and the mountain snowmelt runoff continues.
  • Releases from Tri-lakes dams changing but steady through Denver

    With increased water flowing into Chatfield Reservoir, water managers with the Omaha District, in conjunction with the state of Colorado, are increasing releases from Chatfield Dam and reducing releases from Cherry Creek Dam to keep overall system releases steady. All Tri-Lakes releases will continue to be adjusted based on reservoir and hydrologic conditions. Chatfield Reservoir currently has 5.3 percent of its flood pool occupied with inflows above 2100 cfs and the release at 2050 cfs. Bear Creek Reservoir currently has 31.1 percent of its flood pool occupied with inflows around 670 cfs and a release of 500 cfs. Cherry Creek Reservoir has 1.7 percent of its flood pool occupied with inflows around 100 cfs and a release of 100 cfs. Chatfield and Bear Creek Reservoirs are currently rising and Cherry Creek Reservoir is slowly dropping.
  • Tri-Lakes Dams capture 25,000 acre feet of runoff

    Heavy rain and mountain snowmelt runoff since the beginning of May have produced high flows along the South Platte River in Colorado and its contributing tributary streams. The three Denver-area dams operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District and referred to as the Tri-Lakes Projects are Chatfield, Cherry Creek, and Bear Creek Dams. These three reservoirs have captured a combined 25,000 acre-feet of flood water during this period. The combined storage capacity of these three reservoirs is nearly 314,000 acre feet of water.
  • Tri-Lakes Dams catching runoff from last week's storms

    Runoff from last week's precipitation in Colorado is causing elevated pool levels at the Tri-Lakes dams that are owned and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District. Bear Creek, Chatfield, and Cherry Creek Dams make up the Tri-Lakes Projects and are not experiencing any dam safety issues from the recent heavy precipitation which fell in the Central Rocky Mountains region. As part of a system operations plan to evacuate flood storage, releases from the Tri-Lakes dams are as follows: Bear Creek - 500 cubic feet per second (cfs); Cherry Creek - 250 cfs; Chatfield - increasing from 1500 cfs to 1900 cfs today.
  • Holmes Lake pool levels rise

    Heavy rains recently caused pool rises at Holmes Lake (Salt Creek Dam #17). The reservoir is not currently expected to reach its record pool elevation of 1250.0 feet, which occurred on July 24, 1993. Pool elevation forecasts could change depending on future rainfall. The flood control pool begins at 1242.4 feet at which point the reservoir begins making releases over a weir. Current releases are around 80 cubic feet per second. The pool elevation is slowly dropping and will continue to fall as inflows recede and releases over the weir continue.