Recent Articles

USACE, Omaha District executes historic $1.75B in fiscal year 2021
10/19/2021
There were many challenges this year –finishing the restoration of the Lower Missouri River Basin from the catastrophic flood event of 2019, reintegrating the workforce safely during the COVID-19...
PERSONAL VIGNETTE: Ensuring safety of disaster response volunteers is a mission within a mission
10/18/2021
As public affairs specialists with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, we are used to helping craft messages like “safety is our top priority” and “we are committed to keeping our team safe” but while...
Engineering community comes together in Omaha for SAME Industry Day
10/15/2021
The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, Omaha District took part in the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Omaha Post Industry Day event, Oct. 5 – 7, bringing together the national engineering...
USACE set to complete Lower Yellowstone irrigation, fish bypass project on schedule
10/1/2021
The Omaha District’s Lower Yellowstone irrigation project in south eastern Montana is on budget and on schedule at approximately 85 percent completion. This civil works construction project began in...
Commitment to high-quality blue roof installations for Ida survivors
9/28/2021
Water-logged floorboards. Moldy sheetrock. Broken windows. Desperation. For many survivors of Hurricane Ida, the storm itself was not the worst part—the worst of their experience was the growing...
Results:
Category: Generic
Clear
  • October

    Futures in engineering begin in middle school

    Take 35 enthusiastic middle school students, mix in a natural resource specialist, a biologist, an engineer and the backdrop of the Missouri River, with a barge and a dredger, and you get an education for our students, one STEM at a time.
  • September

    Telling the Cache la Poudre Story at the Civil Works Review Board

    Getting to the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers' Civil Works Review Board is no quick, easy task-just ask Steve Rothe, USACE Project Manager for a proposed environmental restoration project along the Cache la Poudre River in Greeley, Colo.
  • Corps Section 14 project facilitates Scribner’s promising future

    In the spring of 2010, a major flood from the Elkhorn River caused the left river bank just upstream from County Road F and the Elkhorn River Bridge near Scribner, Neb. to erode back 200 feet and decimated an entire tree line several hundred feet long. The Corps' Section 14 Emergency Streambank and Shoreline Protection project will consist of a series of five spur dikes at various locations along the eroded bank. A construction contract was awarded in August 2014 to Iowa-based Niewohner Construction, Inc. for approximately $289,000. Once notice to proceed is given, the project is expected to take no more than six months to complete.
  • April

    Delicate dance with a dinosaur

    There are dozens of elements within the collection including pieces that are at least 5 feet long and take up the length of an entire crate and pieces that are smaller than 5 centimeters, wrapped in foil and paper and stored in sealed plastic bags. Following a checklist that identifies the crate, the box, the body part, and the bone piece; the team photographs and inspects the condition of each fossilized bone.
  • March

    Greybull Levee performs as designed reducing risks from ice jam flooding

    While snowmelt and ice jam flooding can occur at any time, they typically occur during early spring thaw. Any ice jam can cause flooding or rapid increases in water levels within a short time period. Residents living near these rivers are reminded to monitor reports closely for ice jam flooding and be prepared to relocate to higher ground if flooding occurs. The levee in Greybull, Wyo., reduced risks to the town during recent ice jam flooding.
  • November

    Exercising Safety: Bear Creek, Cherry Creek and Chatfield dams catch floodwaters while reducing flooding risks

    A stalled front brings record rainfall to the Front Range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The runoff brings a surge of water through canyons and foothills and into major population centers of central Colorado. But, this surge of water happened only in a virtual environment. During the week of Aug. 19, several employees from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District participated in a safety exercise focused on Cherry Creek Dam and Reservoir near Denver, Colo. – or more to the point, in the middle of the Denver metropolitan area.
  • September

    Corps expert has challenging career

    Julie Clements, is a health physicist in Huntsville Center’s Environmental and Munitions Center of Expertise, Environmental Sciences Division in Omaha, Neb. She works in a demanding environment and carries out multiple missions aimed at keeping workers and the public safe. She says that’s what makes her field of engineering so dynamic.
  • Recognizing volunteer’s 10 years as Fort Peck fixture

    Meet Duane Johnson. Of course, anyone camping at Fort Peck Lake in the last 10 years probably knows him. He has been the volunteer campground host at the Downstream and West End Campgrounds in Fort Peck, Mont., since 2003. Every year, for the last 10 years, April through October, he has been a mainstay.
  • July

    Stolen artifacts returned to Navajo Nation

    On July 9, the Corps of Engineers repatriated a large cache of sacred artifacts to the Navajo Nation. The Omaha District, with some assistance from the Albuquerque District, returned the artifacts in accordance with the Archaeological Resources Protection Act. The artifacts were looted from Corps of Engineers-managed land and Navajo tribal lands. A total of 710 artifacts were recovered from lands managed both by the Corps of Engineers and the Navajo Nation. Out of these, 425 were determined to be the property of the Navajo Nation, and were returned.
  • June

    Fighting drownings like a firefighter

    It is a common misperception that firefighters merely fight fires. Actual firefighting takes up only a small percentage of the time firefighters spend on duty. Another important part of their time is spent educating others about fire prevention and fire safety. This concept rings true for the park rangers and natural resource specialists at lakes areas across the Omaha District who include outreach and water safety education among their regular responsibilities.