• October

    Colorado flooding brings flood of attention to vital regulatory permitting program

    In mid September, a wet monsoonal pattern stalled along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains bringing heavy rains to the foothills west of Boulder. The resulting flooding impacted roads, bridges and other infrastructure, with rivers carving new channels and eroding riverbanks. Major roadways in the Estes Park area sustained severe damages with limited alternatives to access these areas for repairs. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District activated its Emergency Operations Center Sept. 12, in preparation for the anticipated requests for assistance during and following the resulting flooding. Calls also began to flood the Omaha District’s Denver Regulatory office located on Chatfield Dam near Littleton, Colo.
  • September

    Corps expert has challenging career

    Julie Clements, is a health physicist in Huntsville Center’s Environmental and Munitions Center of Expertise, Environmental Sciences Division in Omaha, Neb. She works in a demanding environment and carries out multiple missions aimed at keeping workers and the public safe. She says that’s what makes her field of engineering so dynamic.
  • Recognizing volunteer’s 10 years as Fort Peck fixture

    Meet Duane Johnson. Of course, anyone camping at Fort Peck Lake in the last 10 years probably knows him. He has been the volunteer campground host at the Downstream and West End Campgrounds in Fort Peck, Mont., since 2003. Every year, for the last 10 years, April through October, he has been a mainstay.
  • July

    Stolen artifacts returned to Navajo Nation

    On July 9, the Corps of Engineers repatriated a large cache of sacred artifacts to the Navajo Nation. The Omaha District, with some assistance from the Albuquerque District, returned the artifacts in accordance with the Archaeological Resources Protection Act. The artifacts were looted from Corps of Engineers-managed land and Navajo tribal lands. A total of 710 artifacts were recovered from lands managed both by the Corps of Engineers and the Navajo Nation. Out of these, 425 were determined to be the property of the Navajo Nation, and were returned.
  • Missouri River/Lake Sharpe Clean-up nets big catches

    Tales weren’t of the “one that got away” or the exaggerated size of a hooked walleye, but, more than 4,000 pounds, or two tons, of trash and debris was collected during the annual Missouri River/Lake Sharpe Clean up Wednesday, July 10. The event, the fourth in the last five years, had more than 40 volunteers working along the river in Pierre-Fort Pierre, S.D.

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