US Army Corps of Engineers
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Recent Articles

Corps completes 100-bed alternate care facility in Kalispell, Montana
5/29/2020
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, completed construction on an alternate care facility in Kalispell, Montana, May 24, two days earlier than required. The ACF also came in more than 10%...
USACE employee receives award due to new contracting process deployed during flood efforts.
5/28/2020 UPDATED
A 25-year employee of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, was awarded the Omaha-Lincoln Federal Executive Association 2019, Federal Employee Leadership Award in the...
Dam safety remains top priority amidst COVID-19 challenges
5/19/2020 UPDATED
Despite the challenges of social distancing due to COVID-19, dam safety remains a risk management practice for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Omaha District. Recently a dam safety inspection team...
Combat veteran’s transition from service to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
5/18/2020 UPDATED
Many service members who retire or separate from the military continue to serve their country as Department of Defense employees because they possess specialized training and experiences highly sought...
USACE helps Montana, FEMA prepare for COVID-19 future
5/15/2020
In the three and a half months since the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in the U.S., the state of Montana has the second lowest number of total cases, and the lowest number of cases per capita of...
  • March

    Memo from the Director of Contracting re: COVID-19

    For USACE Contractors, As the Director of Contracting for the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, I wanted to personally reach out to all of you and let you know that we are actively monitoring the situation in regards to the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Attached is the guidance we received on planning for potential Novel Coronavirus Contract Impacts.
  • January

    Special Projects Branch hits 10-year milestone

    In many organizations, there are some tasks and projects that just don’t seem to fit into an easily defined category. This was also the case for the Corps of Engineers Omaha District in 2009. The District had projects that needed to be completed, but didn’t quite fit the mold of the programs they were assigned to. The solution to that issue to the stand up the Special Projects Branch. It was a new concept when the first eight-person team was assembled to take on these outliers, which totaled more than $140 million that first year. Since then, the branch has grown to 52 people and nearly $600 million worth of work annually.
  • Winter doesn't put freeze on flood repairs

    When the unprecedented and historical flooding started in the Missouri and Platte River basins in March 2019, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Omaha District responded immediately. Within hours, the District, led by the Readiness Branch, was developing plans and sending materials out to fight the flood and provide assistance to communities within harm’s way.
  • December

    Invasive species mussel in on Gavins Point Dam

    When you’re talking about the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ six mainstem dams on the Missouri River, the word small is a relative term. While the dams and their powerhouses vary in size, they are all imposing structures. For instance, Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, is the smallest of the six, yet it took 7 million cubic yards of earth to build and its three Kaplan generators are capable of generating electricity for 68,000 homes. This makes it that much more ironic that something as small as a zebra mussel could give it such big problems.
  • Omaha District 2019 Fiscal Year in Review

    It’s been another busy year across the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Omaha District, with many significant accomplishments taking place during 2019. The District closed out the fiscal year Sept. 30 with a $1.4 billion program, one of the largest the district has ever managed, surpassing last year’s total of $1.29 billion. That included more than $61 million in civil works, almost $400 million in military missions, $359 million in special projects and $386 million in environmental missions.
  • October

    Omaha District partners with NRD in ground breaking levee restoration efforts

    The Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District broke ground on levee improvements for the R-613 and R-616 levee systems at Haworth Park, in Belleville, Oct. 15.
  • August

    Military working dogs to get new woof over their heads thanks to Omaha District

    If you were asked where the US Army Corps of Engineers Omaha District was building a new kennel for
  • June

    Planning Army Corps Managed Water Resource Projects

    Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages thousands of water resource projects across the country. The Corps generates hydropower, supplies water to cities and industry, regulates development in navigable waters, restores aquatic ecosystems, assists in national emergencies, provide navigation, flood risk reduction, ecosystem restoration, and is the Nation’s largest provider of recreation. As complicated as many of these sound, each of these missions began as a planning study.
  • Getting to Know the Omaha District: Chuck McWilliams

    With more 700,000 square miles within its area of responsibility, the Omaha District’s 1,200+ employees bring very unique skillsets and experiences to the District’s broad mission set. Positions within the District range from a variety of disciplines, from engineers to real estate experts, to contract specialists, meteorologists, photographers—just to name a few. District employee ages range from low 20s into the mid-to-late 70s. Some of our teammates have experienced some of the best and worse the Midwest has to offer, while others were only toddlers when 9-11 happened. Some have only been with the District for a few weeks, while others have dedicated more than 40 years of their life to the District. All have a story and through this forum, we will begin highlighting some of them so the reader better understand the broad range of diversity we have within the Omaha District.
  • May

    Corps of Engineers leveraging drone technology to capture imagery after flooding in Midwest

    In mid-to-late March, flood water covered much of eastern Nebraska, western Iowa, and northern Missouri. Due to the extreme amount of water in the area, members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District had trouble getting to the more than 500 miles of compromised levees to surveille for damage so they turned to a new option to the Omaha District....drones. Drones, or unmanned aerial systems, offer the District the opportunity to fly over affected levees and other flooded areas without putting District employees in danger.