US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District Website

Recent Articles

USACE Omaha District enters handshake partnership agreement to use goat grazing to control eastern red cedar trees at Fort Randall
9/2/2021
As stewards of almost 400,000 acres of public lands, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District welcomes opportunities to work together with local organizations and communities who share common...
USACE completes new high-altitude research laboratory on Pikes Peak
8/31/2021
The Army’s new high-altitude research laboratory at the top of Pikes Peak in Cascade, Colorado, was officially completed on July 1, and is the highest facility of its kind in North America. Built by...
Air Force Academy, USACE break ground on new cyber facility
8/24/2021
The Stillman parade field on the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, was the site of a groundbreaking ceremony Aug. 6 for the new Madera Cyber Innovation Center. U.S. Air Force...
Acting Assistant Secretary of Army for Civil Works Visits Omaha District
7/22/2021
Mr. Jaime A. Pinkham, Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works, visited the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha...
USACE Omaha District receives Nebraska Safety Council Award for 30th consecutive year
7/1/2021 UPDATED
For the 30th consecutive year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, was named one of Nebraska’s Safest Companies with Distinction by the National Safety Council, Nebraska Chapter May 19...
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Archive: December, 2019
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  • December

    Invasive species mussel in on Gavins Point Dam

    When you’re talking about the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ six mainstem dams on the Missouri River, the word small is a relative term. While the dams and their powerhouses vary in size, they are all imposing structures. For instance, Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, is the smallest of the six, yet it took 7 million cubic yards of earth to build and its three Kaplan generators are capable of generating electricity for 68,000 homes. This makes it that much more ironic that something as small as a zebra mussel could give it such big problems.
  • Omaha District 2019 Fiscal Year in Review

    It’s been another busy year across the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Omaha District, with many significant accomplishments taking place during 2019. The District closed out the fiscal year Sept. 30 with a $1.4 billion program, one of the largest the district has ever managed, surpassing last year’s total of $1.29 billion. That included more than $61 million in civil works, almost $400 million in military missions, $359 million in special projects and $386 million in environmental missions.