US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District Website

Recent Articles

Hydrology? District team provides professional water resources expertise, support
5/5/2021
Flowing through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District’s area of responsibility, the Missouri River is the longest in the U.S. and its basin (watershed) covers more than 500 thousand square...
Ammunition Supply Point expansion opens on Fort Carson
3/30/2021
The Fort Carson Army Field Support Battalion hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony to mark the official opening of new facilities at the Ammunition Supply Point on Fort Carson, Colorado, on March 19...
Initial public scoping a success for Lewis and Clark Lake, Gavins Point Dam master plan update
2/4/2021
Outdoor recreation enthusiasts will reap the future benefits at Lewis and Clark Lake recreation area in Yankton, South Dakota, after the Gavins Point Dam project master plan update, currently...
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers moves to eradicate invasive species
1/12/2021 UPDATED
Since the discovery of zebra mussels at the South Dakota Big Bend powerhouse intake gates in the summer of 2019, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has conducted an internal analysis of the potential...
Omaha District receives distinguished honors for executing record-setting $595 million small business program
1/12/2021
Each year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters Office of Small Business hosts a Small Business Awards Ceremony to recognize districts and individuals across the organization who have made...
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Archive: July, 2013
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  • July

    Stolen artifacts returned to Navajo Nation

    On July 9, the Corps of Engineers repatriated a large cache of sacred artifacts to the Navajo Nation. The Omaha District, with some assistance from the Albuquerque District, returned the artifacts in accordance with the Archaeological Resources Protection Act. The artifacts were looted from Corps of Engineers-managed land and Navajo tribal lands. A total of 710 artifacts were recovered from lands managed both by the Corps of Engineers and the Navajo Nation. Out of these, 425 were determined to be the property of the Navajo Nation, and were returned.
  • Missouri River/Lake Sharpe Clean-up nets big catches

    Tales weren’t of the “one that got away” or the exaggerated size of a hooked walleye, but, more than 4,000 pounds, or two tons, of trash and debris was collected during the annual Missouri River/Lake Sharpe Clean up Wednesday, July 10. The event, the fourth in the last five years, had more than 40 volunteers working along the river in Pierre-Fort Pierre, S.D.