US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District Website

Recent Articles

Omaha District recognized with distinguished industry awards
9/17/2020 UPDATED
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District received multiple awards from industry stakeholders for performance in construction, small business contracting, safety and public affairs. Receiving...
District’s technical center of expertise provides rapid response during emergencies
9/16/2020
With September and October being the peak hurricane months, the Omaha District's rapid response team stands ready to offer disaster relief assistance should the need arise. According the National...
Omaha District’s small business program empowers service disabled Veterans
8/27/2020
The Omaha District is empowering service disabled veterans through a unique program designed to offer competitive work contracts to small business owners. These veteran owned small business are making...
Real estate division provides important mission support across District
8/22/2020
With an area of responsibility covering six states, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado and Montana, the Omaha District is one of the largest within Army Corps of Engineers – with that...
Parks and Recreation real-life mission for Omaha District
8/21/2020
OMAHA, Neb. - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, manages more 235 parks and recreation areas, over 400,000 acres of public lands, and more than one million acres of water surface areas...
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Archive: July, 2013
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  • July

    Stolen artifacts returned to Navajo Nation

    On July 9, the Corps of Engineers repatriated a large cache of sacred artifacts to the Navajo Nation. The Omaha District, with some assistance from the Albuquerque District, returned the artifacts in accordance with the Archaeological Resources Protection Act. The artifacts were looted from Corps of Engineers-managed land and Navajo tribal lands. A total of 710 artifacts were recovered from lands managed both by the Corps of Engineers and the Navajo Nation. Out of these, 425 were determined to be the property of the Navajo Nation, and were returned.
  • Missouri River/Lake Sharpe Clean-up nets big catches

    Tales weren’t of the “one that got away” or the exaggerated size of a hooked walleye, but, more than 4,000 pounds, or two tons, of trash and debris was collected during the annual Missouri River/Lake Sharpe Clean up Wednesday, July 10. The event, the fourth in the last five years, had more than 40 volunteers working along the river in Pierre-Fort Pierre, S.D.