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Recent Articles

Dam safety remains top priority amidst COVID-19 challenges
5/19/2020 UPDATED
Despite the challenges of social distancing due to COVID-19, dam safety remains a risk management practice for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Omaha District. Recently a dam safety inspection team...
Combat veteran’s transition from service to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
5/18/2020 UPDATED
Many service members who retire or separate from the military continue to serve their country as Department of Defense employees because they possess specialized training and experiences highly sought...
USACE helps Montana, FEMA prepare for COVID-19 future
5/15/2020
In the three and a half months since the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in the U.S., the state of Montana has the second lowest number of total cases, and the lowest number of cases per capita of...
Assessments critical step in battling COVID-19 pandemic
5/5/2020
When the COVID-19 pandemic started to spread throughout the Midwest, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, was tasked by FEMA to start assessing sites for possible use as alternate care...
Omaha District balances COVID-19 mission support, employee safety
4/24/2020
Shortly after the federal government declared a state of emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Col. John Hudson, commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, took aggressive steps to...
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  • May

    USACE helps Montana, FEMA prepare for COVID-19 future

    In the three and a half months since the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in the U.S., the state of Montana has the second lowest number of total cases, and the lowest number of cases per capita of any state in the country. Those low numbers did not stop the state’s leaders and FEMA from enlisting the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, to prepare for the future fight against the virus.
  • April

    Omaha District balances COVID-19 mission support, employee safety

    Shortly after the federal government declared a state of emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Col. John Hudson, commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, took aggressive steps to protect the district’s military and civilian workforce - while maintaining mission readiness and support.
  • Corps’ Omaha District spotlights energy efficient, environmentally sustainable headquarters for 50th anniversary of Earth Day

    Built in 1958, the original Zorinsky Building, home to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District’s headquarters, was erected before the modern world embraced the environmental movement. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, renovations to the 432,000 square-foot building managed by the Government Services Administration have been implemented based on the standards and criteria of the U.S. Green Council’s Sustainability Program to make the building more energy efficient and environmentally friendly.
  • USACE civilian graduates DINFOS: A peek into his experience there

    USACE CIVILIAN GRADUATES DINFOS A PEEK INTO HIS EXPERIENCE THERE
  • Chaining ensures Corps’ bridges not weakest link

    For more than 25 years, the sound of rattling chains has pierced the air whenever Lyle Peterson crossed one of the bridges spanning the Missouri River at one the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Omaha District’s six mainstem dams.
  • December

    Invasive species mussel in on Gavins Point Dam

    When you’re talking about the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ six mainstem dams on the Missouri River, the word small is a relative term. While the dams and their powerhouses vary in size, they are all imposing structures. For instance, Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, is the smallest of the six, yet it took 7 million cubic yards of earth to build and its three Kaplan generators are capable of generating electricity for 68,000 homes. This makes it that much more ironic that something as small as a zebra mussel could give it such big problems.
  • Omaha District 2019 Fiscal Year in Review

    It’s been another busy year across the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Omaha District, with many significant accomplishments taking place during 2019. The District closed out the fiscal year Sept. 30 with a $1.4 billion program, one of the largest the district has ever managed, surpassing last year’s total of $1.29 billion. That included more than $61 million in civil works, almost $400 million in military missions, $359 million in special projects and $386 million in environmental missions.
  • June

    Planning Army Corps Managed Water Resource Projects

    Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages thousands of water resource projects across the country. The Corps generates hydropower, supplies water to cities and industry, regulates development in navigable waters, restores aquatic ecosystems, assists in national emergencies, provide navigation, flood risk reduction, ecosystem restoration, and is the Nation’s largest provider of recreation. As complicated as many of these sound, each of these missions began as a planning study.
  • Getting to Know the Omaha District: Chuck McWilliams

    With more 700,000 square miles within its area of responsibility, the Omaha District’s 1,200+ employees bring very unique skillsets and experiences to the District’s broad mission set. Positions within the District range from a variety of disciplines, from engineers to real estate experts, to contract specialists, meteorologists, photographers—just to name a few. District employee ages range from low 20s into the mid-to-late 70s. Some of our teammates have experienced some of the best and worse the Midwest has to offer, while others were only toddlers when 9-11 happened. Some have only been with the District for a few weeks, while others have dedicated more than 40 years of their life to the District. All have a story and through this forum, we will begin highlighting some of them so the reader better understand the broad range of diversity we have within the Omaha District.
  • May

    Corps of Engineers leveraging drone technology to capture imagery after flooding in Midwest

    In mid-to-late March, flood water covered much of eastern Nebraska, western Iowa, and northern Missouri. Due to the extreme amount of water in the area, members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District had trouble getting to the more than 500 miles of compromised levees to surveille for damage so they turned to a new option to the Omaha District....drones. Drones, or unmanned aerial systems, offer the District the opportunity to fly over affected levees and other flooded areas without putting District employees in danger.