US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District

Recent Articles

Military working dogs to get new woof over their heads thanks to Omaha District
8/15/2019 UPDATED
If you were asked where the US Army Corps of Engineers Omaha District was building a new kennel for military working dogs, what would your guess be?Newfoundland? Barksdale Air Force Base?The answer is...
Managing Army Corps Water Resource Projects
6/26/2019 UPDATED
Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages thousands of water resource projects across the country. The Corps generates hydropower, supplies water to cities and industry, regulates development...
Getting to Know the Omaha District: Chuck McWilliams
6/20/2019
With more 700,000 square miles within its area of responsibility, the Omaha District’s 1,200+ employees bring very unique skillsets and experiences to the District’s broad mission set. Positions...
Corps of Engineers leveraging drone technology to capture imagery after flooding in Midwest
5/10/2019 UPDATED
In mid-to-late March, flood water covered much of eastern Nebraska, western Iowa, and northern Missouri. Due to the extreme amount of water in the area, members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,...
Omaha District System Restoration Team in full swing bringing levee system back up
5/1/2019
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District responded to the devastating unregulated runoff event of 2019 by activating the Omaha Systems Restoration Team, whose mission is to provide regional,...
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  • June

    Planning Army Corps Managed Water Resource Projects

    Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages thousands of water resource projects across the country. The Corps generates hydropower, supplies water to cities and industry, regulates development in navigable waters, restores aquatic ecosystems, assists in national emergencies, provide navigation, flood risk reduction, ecosystem restoration, and is the Nation’s largest provider of recreation. As complicated as many of these sound, each of these missions began as a planning study.
  • Getting to Know the Omaha District: Chuck McWilliams

    With more 700,000 square miles within its area of responsibility, the Omaha District’s 1,200+ employees bring very unique skillsets and experiences to the District’s broad mission set. Positions within the District range from a variety of disciplines, from engineers to real estate experts, to contract specialists, meteorologists, photographers—just to name a few. District employee ages range from low 20s into the mid-to-late 70s. Some of our teammates have experienced some of the best and worse the Midwest has to offer, while others were only toddlers when 9-11 happened. Some have only been with the District for a few weeks, while others have dedicated more than 40 years of their life to the District. All have a story and through this forum, we will begin highlighting some of them so the reader better understand the broad range of diversity we have within the Omaha District.
  • May

    Corps of Engineers leveraging drone technology to capture imagery after flooding in Midwest

    In mid-to-late March, flood water covered much of eastern Nebraska, western Iowa, and northern Missouri. Due to the extreme amount of water in the area, members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District had trouble getting to the more than 500 miles of compromised levees to surveille for damage so they turned to a new option to the Omaha District....drones. Drones, or unmanned aerial systems, offer the District the opportunity to fly over affected levees and other flooded areas without putting District employees in danger.
  • Omaha District System Restoration Team in full swing bringing levee system back up

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District responded to the devastating unregulated runoff event of 2019 by activating the Omaha Systems Restoration Team, whose mission is to provide regional, time-sensitive repair of levees, dams and other flood control structures that were damaged throughout the Missouri River Basin.
  • February

    Popularity of annual ‘Bald Eagle Days’ soars

    Amidst the murmur of the eager spectators strolling around and looking at the many wildlife exhibits at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center near Yankton, South Dakota, three avian performers await their moment in the spotlight.
  • January

    Public service is a lifestyle choice some embrace fully

    The phone rings. It’s a concerned citizen who wants to know when a pothole on her street will be fixed. A pinging text alert reminds that a fundraiser event is tonight. An email pops up into her inbox. It’s a man complaining about his neighbor’s dog. It’s only 6:45 a.m. but as Councilmember Melissa Head slips into her shoes and heads out the door, she knows it’s going to be a busy day, like most of her days.
  • 2018 ushers in major milestones for the Missouri River Recovery Program

    The efforts of those involved in the Missouri River Recovery Program culminated in several significant milestones in 2018, including receiving a biological opinion with a “no-jeopardy” finding from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, signing the Missouri River Recovery Management Plan Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, as well as the Missouri River Recovery Implementation Committee’s 10-year anniversary celebration.
  • October

    First Space Brigade gets a new home on Fort Carson

    The U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command's 1st Space Brigade is getting a new home on Fort Carson, Colorado, early next year thanks to the efforts of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  • January

    Public Affairs Chief reflects on more than 30 years of civil service

    Margaret E. Oldham (Maggie) wraps up a 30-year civil service career and enters a new adventure called retirement.
  • February

    Breaking barriers: Army opens first-of-its-kind ACP in Germany

    WIESBADEN, Germany — The Clay Kaserne Access Control Point is the first Department of Defense project worldwide to employ a new active vehicle barrier safety scheme, know as High Efficiency Presence Detection.