US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District Website

Recent Articles

Omaha District recognized with distinguished industry awards
9/17/2020 UPDATED
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District received multiple awards from industry stakeholders for performance in construction, small business contracting, safety and public affairs. Receiving...
District’s technical center of expertise provides rapid response during emergencies
9/16/2020
With September and October being the peak hurricane months, the Omaha District's rapid response team stands ready to offer disaster relief assistance should the need arise. According the National...
Omaha District’s small business program empowers service disabled Veterans
8/27/2020
The Omaha District is empowering service disabled veterans through a unique program designed to offer competitive work contracts to small business owners. These veteran owned small business are making...
Real estate division provides important mission support across District
8/22/2020
With an area of responsibility covering six states, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado and Montana, the Omaha District is one of the largest within Army Corps of Engineers – with that...
Parks and Recreation real-life mission for Omaha District
8/21/2020
OMAHA, Neb. - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, manages more 235 parks and recreation areas, over 400,000 acres of public lands, and more than one million acres of water surface areas...
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Author: Eileen Williamson, Public Affairs Specialist
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  • August

    Managing a river is dam challenging

    In 2013, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Omaha District Leadership Development Class developed a video game that invites players to plan and make releases from two inland waterway dams. The Omaha District, with class members as project managers, awarded a contract to the U.S. Army Game Design studio to design the game. The game allows players to take charge of river operations and experience the unique challenges presented when managing reservoir operations in a variety of weather conditions across a geographically diverse basin. Like the real world, the weather forecast isn’t always accurate, presenting an additional challenge.
  • October

    Where to go in a Zombie Apocalypse? What about a Nuclear Attack?

    Zombies. They’re at your door. Sure, this time it’s just trick or treaters. BUT... What would you do if it were really zombies? Where would you go? What supplies would you need? Where would you use the bathroom? How would you get food or water and where would you sleep? Instead of zombies, think 1960s and the threat? A potential nuclear disaster. Just in time for Halloween, peek into life in a fallout shelter as presented in a display at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season.
  • September

    Safety drills prepare crews for “what if”

    Crews performing a repair contract at Big Bend Dam recently held an exercise to practice safely rescuing a worker who has become incapacitated in their work area. Contractor J.F. Brennan is repairing the spillway gates at Big Bend Dam near Chamberlain, S.D. During the exercise, a mannequin, playing the part of an incapacitated worker who was overcome by paint fumes, needed to be rescued from an area 25 feet above the spillway concrete and 50 feet from the nearest mechanical lift. Once the team extracted the mannequin from the work area, they faced the additional challenge of moving it out of the spillway over the 20-foot-high wing wall using the lift and providing first aid while getting medical attention in a remote location.
  • August

    Military Munitions Remediation at Camp Hale: the project, the history, the public

    Through the Department of Defense’s Formerly Used Defense Sites mission and under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District is cleaning up contamination, addressing military munitions, and removing safety hazards caused by past activities near Camp Hale, Colo., where the Army trained for winter warfare from 1942 to 1965.
  • USACE publications begin moving to digital environment

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Library is giving a permanent home to a large collection of publications, reports and documents prepared by districts across USACE. The materials within the collection include information by and about the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. All content is contributed by offices throughout USACE and is enriched with metadata designated by its contributors and librarians. The digitized materials are uploaded into the CONTENTdm® Digital Collection Management System which allows for greater search and retrieval of items. The digital library is managed and maintained by the USACE Library Program.
  • Runway replacement project nearing completion

    The final phase of a three-phase $67 million program to completely replace the Minot Air Force Base, N.D., runway begain in April 2014. The $32.8 million construction contract is scheduled for completion in early October.
  • April

    Delicate dance with a dinosaur

    There are dozens of elements within the collection including pieces that are at least 5 feet long and take up the length of an entire crate and pieces that are smaller than 5 centimeters, wrapped in foil and paper and stored in sealed plastic bags. Following a checklist that identifies the crate, the box, the body part, and the bone piece; the team photographs and inspects the condition of each fossilized bone.
  • March

    Greybull Levee performs as designed reducing risks from ice jam flooding

    While snowmelt and ice jam flooding can occur at any time, they typically occur during early spring thaw. Any ice jam can cause flooding or rapid increases in water levels within a short time period. Residents living near these rivers are reminded to monitor reports closely for ice jam flooding and be prepared to relocate to higher ground if flooding occurs. The levee in Greybull, Wyo., reduced risks to the town during recent ice jam flooding.
  • Project maintenance, cavitation repairs and OJT

    Among the various projects taking place at Gavins Point Power Plant, generator unit number three was recently dewatered to allow project crews to inspect the draft tube for damage caused by cavitation and make the necessary repairs. Cavitation repairs in the draft tube for unit three will continue through mid-March. Additional maintenance and rehabilitation projects are also underway at the Gavins Point project including replacing three power transformers and rehabilitating the spillway’s tainter gates. Work will move to unit two for annual generator maintenance, to install new un-watering and drain valves, to install a new motor control center, and replace switchgear equipment.
  • November

    Exercising Safety: Bear Creek, Cherry Creek and Chatfield dams catch floodwaters while reducing flooding risks

    A stalled front brings record rainfall to the Front Range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The runoff brings a surge of water through canyons and foothills and into major population centers of central Colorado. But, this surge of water happened only in a virtual environment. During the week of Aug. 19, several employees from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District participated in a safety exercise focused on Cherry Creek Dam and Reservoir near Denver, Colo. – or more to the point, in the middle of the Denver metropolitan area.