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Recent Articles

Dam safety remains top priority amidst COVID-19 challenges
5/19/2020 UPDATED
Despite the challenges of social distancing due to COVID-19, dam safety remains a risk management practice for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Omaha District. Recently a dam safety inspection team...
Combat veteran’s transition from service to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
5/18/2020 UPDATED
Many service members who retire or separate from the military continue to serve their country as Department of Defense employees because they possess specialized training and experiences highly sought...
USACE helps Montana, FEMA prepare for COVID-19 future
5/15/2020
In the three and a half months since the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in the U.S., the state of Montana has the second lowest number of total cases, and the lowest number of cases per capita of...
Assessments critical step in battling COVID-19 pandemic
5/5/2020
When the COVID-19 pandemic started to spread throughout the Midwest, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, was tasked by FEMA to start assessing sites for possible use as alternate care...
Omaha District balances COVID-19 mission support, employee safety
4/24/2020
Shortly after the federal government declared a state of emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Col. John Hudson, commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, took aggressive steps to...

Where to go in a Zombie Apocalypse? What about a Nuclear Attack?

Omaha District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Published Oct. 20, 2014
In the 1960s, the Office of Civil Defense, with help from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other Federal agencies led an effort to answer this question. But, instead of zombies, the threat was from a potential nuclear disaster. The Civil Defense Fallout Shelter items were on display at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season. Background photo is courtesy of Thierry Ehrmann to copy and redistribute with credit via creativecommons.org 2.0 attribution.

In the 1960s, the Office of Civil Defense, with help from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other Federal agencies led an effort to answer this question. But, instead of zombies, the threat was from a potential nuclear disaster. The Civil Defense Fallout Shelter items were on display at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season. Background photo is courtesy of Thierry Ehrmann to copy and redistribute with credit via creativecommons.org 2.0 attribution.

Zombies. They’re at your door. Sure, this time it’s just trick or treaters. BUT...

What would you do if it were really zombies? Where would you go? What supplies would you need? Where would you use the bathroom? How would you get food or water and where would you sleep?

In the 1960s, the Office of Civil Defense, with help from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other Federal agencies, led an effort to answer this question. But, instead of zombies, the threat was from a potential nuclear disaster.

Just in time for Halloween, peek into life in a fallout shelter as presented in a display prepared by Park Ranger Karla Zeutenhorst at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season.

Zombies. They’re at your door. Sure, this time it’s just trick or treaters. BUT What would you do if it were really zombies? Where would you go? What supplies would you need? Where would you use the bathroom? How would you get food or water and where would you sleep? Instead of zombies, think 1960s and the threat; a potential nuclear disaster. Just in time for Halloween, peek into life in a fallout shelter as presented in a display at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center, at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season.