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Recent Articles

Hydrology? District team provides professional water resources expertise, support
5/5/2021
Flowing through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District’s area of responsibility, the Missouri River is the longest in the U.S. and its basin (watershed) covers more than 500 thousand square...
Ammunition Supply Point expansion opens on Fort Carson
3/30/2021
The Fort Carson Army Field Support Battalion hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony to mark the official opening of new facilities at the Ammunition Supply Point on Fort Carson, Colorado, on March 19...
Initial public scoping a success for Lewis and Clark Lake, Gavins Point Dam master plan update
2/4/2021
Outdoor recreation enthusiasts will reap the future benefits at Lewis and Clark Lake recreation area in Yankton, South Dakota, after the Gavins Point Dam project master plan update, currently...
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers moves to eradicate invasive species
1/12/2021 UPDATED
Since the discovery of zebra mussels at the South Dakota Big Bend powerhouse intake gates in the summer of 2019, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has conducted an internal analysis of the potential...
Omaha District receives distinguished honors for executing record-setting $595 million small business program
1/12/2021
Each year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters Office of Small Business hosts a Small Business Awards Ceremony to recognize districts and individuals across the organization who have made...

Where to go in a Zombie Apocalypse? What about a Nuclear Attack?

Omaha District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Published Oct. 20, 2014
In the 1960s, the Office of Civil Defense, with help from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other Federal agencies led an effort to answer this question. But, instead of zombies, the threat was from a potential nuclear disaster. The Civil Defense Fallout Shelter items were on display at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season. Background photo is courtesy of Thierry Ehrmann to copy and redistribute with credit via creativecommons.org 2.0 attribution.

In the 1960s, the Office of Civil Defense, with help from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other Federal agencies led an effort to answer this question. But, instead of zombies, the threat was from a potential nuclear disaster. The Civil Defense Fallout Shelter items were on display at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season. Background photo is courtesy of Thierry Ehrmann to copy and redistribute with credit via creativecommons.org 2.0 attribution.

Zombies. They’re at your door. Sure, this time it’s just trick or treaters. BUT...

What would you do if it were really zombies? Where would you go? What supplies would you need? Where would you use the bathroom? How would you get food or water and where would you sleep?

In the 1960s, the Office of Civil Defense, with help from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other Federal agencies, led an effort to answer this question. But, instead of zombies, the threat was from a potential nuclear disaster.

Just in time for Halloween, peek into life in a fallout shelter as presented in a display prepared by Park Ranger Karla Zeutenhorst at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season.

Zombies. They’re at your door. Sure, this time it’s just trick or treaters. BUT What would you do if it were really zombies? Where would you go? What supplies would you need? Where would you use the bathroom? How would you get food or water and where would you sleep? Instead of zombies, think 1960s and the threat; a potential nuclear disaster. Just in time for Halloween, peek into life in a fallout shelter as presented in a display at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center, at Gavins Point Dam during the 2014 recreation season.