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Acting Assistant Secretary of Army for Civil Works Visits Omaha District
7/22/2021
Mr. Jaime A. Pinkham, Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works, visited the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha...
USACE Omaha District receives Nebraska Safety Council Award for 30th consecutive year
7/1/2021 UPDATED
For the 30th consecutive year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, was named one of Nebraska’s Safest Companies with Distinction by the National Safety Council, Nebraska Chapter May 19...
4th Battalion, 4th Aviation Regiment Soldiers move into new Apache attack hanger on Fort Carson
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USACE, Omaha District conducts employee safety perception survey through National Safety Council
6/3/2021
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Hydrology? District team provides professional water resources expertise, support
5/5/2021
Flowing through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District’s area of responsibility, the Missouri River is the longest in the U.S. and its basin (watershed) covers more than 500 thousand square...

District parks, recreation staff urge visitors to recreate safely amid dry weather, COVID-19 pandemic

Omaha District
Published May 28, 2021
An infographic with tips for physical distancing in public parks and trails. Remember that physical distancing requirements are still in place at USACE parks and recreation areas, despite the new CDC guidelines for vaccinated individuals.

An infographic with tips for physical distancing in public parks and trails. Remember that physical distancing requirements are still in place at USACE parks and recreation areas, despite the new CDC guidelines for vaccinated individuals.

An infographic showing the differences between a thunderstorm warning and a thunderstorm watch. Before traveling to a campground or recreation area, know what the local weather conditions will be and be prepared.

An infographic showing the differences between a thunderstorm warning and a thunderstorm watch. Before traveling to a campground or recreation area, know what the local weather conditions will be and be prepared.

A map of places where the invasive emerald ash borer has been detected

A map of places where the invasive emerald ash borer has been detected. Refer to this map when collecting firewood and avoid bringing firewood across long distances, as it could be infested.

As summer approaches, more people are heading out to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District parks and recreation areas. However, this year brings new safety concerns to keep in mind when recreating on USACE lands.

According to Zach Montreuil, a natural resources specialist with the Omaha District, despite the new CDC guidance for fully vaccinated individuals USACE recreation facilities still require all visitors to wear masks indoors and stay socially distanced.

“Masks are still going to be required inside buildings like visitors centers, project offices, comfort stations, restrooms, and anytime you’re outside and not maintaining a six-foot distance from other visitors,” he said.

The mask rules are different for the outdoors. When visitors are alone with their household or swimming, they can remove their masks. Although being outdoors reduces the risk of COVID-19 infection, Montreuil notes that visitors should still wear masks and stay socially distanced on crowded trails or campgrounds.

Despite the new restrictions and rules, visitors can make reservations and pay online at Recreation.gov. Visitors can reserve camping areas, pavilions, picnic shelters, and other sites. By making reservations online, visitors avoid overcrowding, creating a safer experience for all.

“If you pull up to a swimming beach for example, and it looks like there’s not really much room, or if the parking spaces are full, it’s probably good to go somewhere else, unfortunately, just to keep people safe and everything. So, we always encourage people to feel free to call the project offices to see if it’s anticipated that it’s going to be busy or not and just see current conditions,” Montreuil said.

This summer has new challenges for campers with both the Missouri Basin and Fort Peck anticipating extremely dry weather. Visitors are reminded to start fires only in approved fire rings or grills away from dry vegetation, and ensure that fires are fully extinguished before leaving. Campers should also remember to always have a shovel and bucket of water handy if they plan on starting a fire.

When starting fires at campgrounds, it is also important that visitors buy firewood locally or collect local sticks and branches instead of hauling firewood from long distances. Firewood from other areas, especially ash wood, can contain the emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that kills ash trees.

Dry conditions are not the only weather phenomenon that campers need to pay attention to.

“We’re in an area in the plains that gets tornadoes and strong thunderstorms,” Montreuil said. “We have shelters available at most of our campground areas, but people should make sure to identify where those shelters are and what to do, and just make a quick plan in case you have to seek shelter.”

This year also brings many changes for boaters. The Coast Guard recently mandated that covered recreational vessels must have an Engine Cutoff Switch, a requirement that park rangers, local game wardens, and other officials will be enforcing.

At the Fort Peck (Montana) Reservoir in particular, the drier weather led to a lower water level than usual.

“If people are boating, they need to pay extra attention to underwater hazards that may not have been there in previous years and use caution while boating,” said Sue Dalbey, natural resources specialist, Fort Peck Interpretive Center.

As the summer goes on and more places reopen, the rules and outdoor conditions are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, Montreuil recommends following the CDC guidance on COVID-19 regulations.

For those planning to visit Fort Peck, Dalbey recommends contacting the Interpretive Center at (406) 526 -3493 or visiting their Facebook page to learn about current hours and events.