US Army Corps of Engineers
Omaha District Website

Recent Articles

Hydrology? District team provides professional water resources expertise, support
5/5/2021
Flowing through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District’s area of responsibility, the Missouri River is the longest in the U.S. and its basin (watershed) covers more than 500 thousand square...
Ammunition Supply Point expansion opens on Fort Carson
3/30/2021
The Fort Carson Army Field Support Battalion hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony to mark the official opening of new facilities at the Ammunition Supply Point on Fort Carson, Colorado, on March 19...
Initial public scoping a success for Lewis and Clark Lake, Gavins Point Dam master plan update
2/4/2021
Outdoor recreation enthusiasts will reap the future benefits at Lewis and Clark Lake recreation area in Yankton, South Dakota, after the Gavins Point Dam project master plan update, currently...
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers moves to eradicate invasive species
1/12/2021 UPDATED
Since the discovery of zebra mussels at the South Dakota Big Bend powerhouse intake gates in the summer of 2019, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has conducted an internal analysis of the potential...
Omaha District receives distinguished honors for executing record-setting $595 million small business program
1/12/2021
Each year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters Office of Small Business hosts a Small Business Awards Ceremony to recognize districts and individuals across the organization who have made...
Results:
Archive: 2020
Clear
  • May

    Dam safety remains top priority amidst COVID-19 challenges

    Despite the challenges of social distancing due to COVID-19, dam safety remains a risk management practice for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Omaha District. Recently a dam safety inspection team conducted its periodic inspection of the Salt Creek Dam Site 2, Olive Creek Dam south of Lincoln, Nebraska.
  • Combat veteran’s transition from service to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    Many service members who retire or separate from the military continue to serve their country as Department of Defense employees because they possess specialized training and experiences highly sought after by the federal civilian workforce.
  • USACE helps Montana, FEMA prepare for COVID-19 future

    In the three and a half months since the first COVID-19 case was diagnosed in the U.S., the state of Montana has the second lowest number of total cases, and the lowest number of cases per capita of any state in the country. Those low numbers did not stop the state’s leaders and FEMA from enlisting the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, to prepare for the future fight against the virus.
  • Assessments critical step in battling COVID-19 pandemic

    When the COVID-19 pandemic started to spread throughout the Midwest, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, was tasked by FEMA to start assessing sites for possible use as alternate care facilities.
  • April

    Omaha District balances COVID-19 mission support, employee safety

    Shortly after the federal government declared a state of emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Col. John Hudson, commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, took aggressive steps to protect the district’s military and civilian workforce - while maintaining mission readiness and support.
  • Corps’ Omaha District spotlights energy efficient, environmentally sustainable headquarters for 50th anniversary of Earth Day

    Built in 1958, the original Zorinsky Building, home to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District’s headquarters, was erected before the modern world embraced the environmental movement. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, renovations to the 432,000 square-foot building managed by the Government Services Administration have been implemented based on the standards and criteria of the U.S. Green Council’s Sustainability Program to make the building more energy efficient and environmentally friendly.
  • USACE civilian graduates DINFOS: A peek into his experience there

    USACE CIVILIAN GRADUATES DINFOS A PEEK INTO HIS EXPERIENCE THERE
  • Chaining ensures Corps’ bridges not weakest link

    For more than 25 years, the sound of rattling chains has pierced the air whenever Lyle Peterson crossed one of the bridges spanning the Missouri River at one the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Omaha District’s six mainstem dams.
  • March

    Memo from the Director of Contracting re: COVID-19

    For USACE Contractors, As the Director of Contracting for the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, I wanted to personally reach out to all of you and let you know that we are actively monitoring the situation in regards to the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Attached is the guidance we received on planning for potential Novel Coronavirus Contract Impacts.
  • January

    Special Projects Branch hits 10-year milestone

    In many organizations, there are some tasks and projects that just don’t seem to fit into an easily defined category. This was also the case for the Corps of Engineers Omaha District in 2009. The District had projects that needed to be completed, but didn’t quite fit the mold of the programs they were assigned to. The solution to that issue to the stand up the Special Projects Branch. It was a new concept when the first eight-person team was assembled to take on these outliers, which totaled more than $140 million that first year. Since then, the branch has grown to 52 people and nearly $600 million worth of work annually.