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Deadman's Run Flood Risk Management Project, Lincoln NE

An open house was held on January 17, 2017 to update the public on the Deadmans Run flood risk management study in Lincoln, Nebraska. Over 100 were in attendance.
Deadmans Run Open House
An open house was held on January 17, 2017 to update the public on the Deadmans Run flood risk management study in Lincoln, Nebraska. Over 100 were in attendance.
Omaha District Project Manager Mark Nelson provides information about the Deadmans Run Flood Risk Management Feasibility Study at a public scoping meeting on June 30, 2015 in Lincoln. Approximately 80 people attended the meeting at the 4th Presbyterian Church.
Deadsmans Run Flood Risk Management Study Public Scoping Meeting
Omaha District Project Manager Mark Nelson provides information about the Deadmans Run Flood Risk Management Feasibility Study at a public scoping meeting on June 30, 2015 in Lincoln. Approximately 80 people attended the meeting at the 4th Presbyterian Church.

Project Name: Deadman's Run Flood Risk Management Study
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Authority: Section 205 of the Flood Control Act of 1948, as amended
Sponsors: Lower Platte South Natural Resources District (NRD), City of Lincoln
Current Phase: Feasibility

The Lower Platte South NRD and city of Lincoln (non-federal sponsors) are partnering with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Omaha District) on a study to evaluate possible flood risk management solutions along Deadman's Run, a tributary of Salt Creek, in Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Significant floods and high water events have been recorded along Salt Creek and its tributaries in 1908, 1951, 1957, 1989, 2014 and 2015 with the events in June 1951 and July 1957 reportedly the most severe on Deadman's Run. Flooding along Deadman's Run is characterized as flashy with swift overbank flows once the stream spills out of the channel. In the upper part of the Deadman's Run basin, flooding can negatively impact U.S. Highway 34 (O Street), a major east-west roadway through Lincoln, while flooding in the lower basin can cause widespread residential and commercial property damage in northeast Lincoln. Lower basin flooding can also affect major transportation infrastructure including U.S. Highway 6, the BNSF Railroad main line and many major Lincoln streets including 33rd, 48th, 56th, Holdrege, Cottner, Vine, Leighton and Huntington.

The purpose of the Deadman's Run feasibility study is to identify the potential for developing flood risk management solutions, which could be structural and nonstructural, that are beneficial to the public, economically viable, and environmentally acceptable in this highly urbanized area.

Project Update: The Omaha District, in cooperation with the Lower Platte South NRD and city of Lincoln, held an open house on January 17, 2017 at the Nebraska Education Telecommunications Center in Lincoln. The purpose of the open house was to provide area residents, businesses and other interested parties with an update on the Deadman's Run flood risk management feasibility study. There were approximately 100 in attendance.